Hindu Code Bill

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This cartoon predicted what was in store for Hindu Society when the bill was being passed. Dr. Rajendra Prasad vehemently opposed it. If only had we heard them.

The Hindu Code Bill, passed during  1950s in India, alleged to unify Hindus and thus the whole of India, is still a controversial subject and is considered by many as a ploy to retain Hindus in a cocoon of pseudo nationalism and pseudo secularism. Today we know that the Bill has done more harm to Hindus.

It is worthwhile to mention that four Hindu Code Bills were passed and these are Hindu Marriage Act (1955), Hindu Succession Act (1956), Hindu Minority and Guardianship Act (1956) and Hindu Adoptions and Maintenance Act (1956).

Hindu Code Bill faced sharp criticisms of Hindu nationalists including Dr. S.P. Mokerjee and N.C. Chatterjee as they considered such an act was not only an assault on Hindus but also a threat to stability and veracity of traditional forms of marriage and the family in Hindu society. Swami Karpatriji, highly revered sanyasi belonging to the Dandis, launched a mass struggle to call this move a halt.

Ram Rajya Parishad, his own political party, organized copious demonstrations against the Hindu Code Bill. 15,000 people did attend a week-long conference in Delhi at the beginning of 1949 and some of them were personalities like Princess of Dewas Senior (a former princely state in Central India).

Even Rajendra Prasad, elected as President of the Republic in 1950, was hurt by this notion for having ‘new concepts and new ideas…. are not only foreign to Hindu Law but may cause disruption in every family’.

But Nehru was unstoppable and Hindu Code Bill continues to rule Hindus.

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About Amartya Talukdar

About: AMARTYA TALUKDAR was born in Kolkata, India. He has done his Masters in Mechanical Engineering from Indian Institute of Technology Benaras Hindu University. He is an avid blogger, computer geek , humanist , rationalist .
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